Book-Writing Advice for my Spanish-Speaking Readers

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Today is July 27th (07/27), a full-circle day for me. I was re-baptized two years ago on this day (only because I don’t remember my baptism as a baby, and I wanted to be aware of my outward expression of faith), and I'll be taking my first cruise today. We won't get into the "irony" and symbolism of the water...we'll save that for another day! *wink, wink*

Anyway, the cruise destination is MEXICO. And because I want to solidify my mark as an International Author, I'm releasing the Spanish translation of my "How To Write Your First Book: Helping Aspiring Authors Overcome the Book-Writing Hurdle" book today. 

This is only the beginning...things are getting "global" around here! :)

CLICK HERE to purchase the eBook (or click the picture above.)

Nailah

The 4 Different Types of Book Editing

The 4 Different Types of Book Editing

Good morning, writers!

At the top of the year, I said that 2018 is the year of the writer (specifically, the author). It is now the end of April and I still believe that. But you what I realized? I encouraged aspiring authors to write their first book, but I didn’t share the tools to help them/you edit and publish their/your book, as well as write it.

So, today, we’re going to talk about the editing process.

Depending on your need, the editing process may be lengthy because you may need multiple steps instead of one step. And that’s okay!

What are the steps in an editing process? Well, let’s break it down by editing type.

There are 4 different types of book editing. I will list them below:
 

DEVELOPMENTAL EDITING

Developmental editing is an in-depth edit of a manuscript. It focuses on the story’s setting, plot, characters, and flow. This editing type is very involved and checks for the fluidity/clarity of the author’s content, tone of voice, etc. Developmental editing also examines whether or not a story is missing something or in need of a few cuts. (Rewrites happen in this editing phase.) Authors, have thick skin when dealing w/ your developmental editor. They’re there to help you develop your story and make it...well, worth reading.

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3 Hacks to Help You Write Your Book Faster

3 Hacks to Help You Write Your Book Faster

Happy Monday, writers!

Oh, wait. Excuse me.

Happy MLK Day, writers!

Three years ago today, I published my first (and only) short story. Like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK), I, too, had a dream. As a child, I dreamt of becoming a famous author among other things. I didn't think it was possible, so I pushed that dream aside and pursued careers that had more clearly-outlined paths like teaching.

Nevertheless, January 15, 2015, was the day one of my dreams became a reality. My short story Confessions of an Adult Nerd: The Bay Area Blues (Volume 1) hit Amazon and was well received.

It was a process to write that book. Allow me to briefly explain why...

My first book, SoKoDiaries: An American Teacher Living in South Korea, was a biography of sorts, where I revealed my excursions as an English teacher living in a foreign country. While living and teaching overseas in South Korea (SoKo), I had tons to write about because I was experiencing something that was new to me and my audience at the time. In fact, this is what my audience was used to reading from me: true stories about my life as an educator.

But after the third and final volume of SokoDiaries--my first book series about my teaching in South Korea--I wanted to try something different. I wanted to try my hand at short stories. My childhood dreams and vivid imagination came rushing to me near the end of 2014, and I needed a creative outlet. I wasn't confident in my ability to pull off another book genre other than non-fiction, but I tried it anyway. In honor of MLK, I made my dream a reality by clicking "publish" on Amazon three years ago.

Confessions of an Adult Nerd: The Bay Area Blues (Volume 1) is MY testimony. I thank you guys for celebrating my bookiversary with me, but what about YOUR testimony. I know writing a book is challenging, but perhaps I can give a few simple strategies you can use to make the book-writing process more digestible. This blog post consists of three hacks to help you write your book faster.

I understand that there are different types of writers. Some writers are decision makers, so it doesn't take them long to create chapter titles, book covers, etc. because they're sold on their decisions right away. But that's not everyone's testimony. In fact, I know of a few writers who like to let their work sit for a while, and they come back to it days and weeks (and maybe even years) later to make sure it's what they really want to share. Whatever type of writer you are, I believe these three writing hacks will help you write your book in less time than you think is necessary.

1 || Put your book in a 3-ring binder so you know it’s real.

This may sound cheesy and pretentious all at the same time, but it works. Sometimes, we get so tied to our computers/laptops that we cannot see our writing progress or lack thereof. If you print out your book and see blank chapters, then it'll hopefully inspire you to create chapter titles along with the content that is appropriate for each chapter. Or you may find that you actually need to edit a few chapters and scale down. Or you may find that your book is not that far from being publish-worthy. The physical, printed papers help with the book-writing process because your work will feel more like a book, and it will be organized in case you want family and friends to proofread it.

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Why You Should Set A Deadline When Writing Your Book

Why You Should Set A Deadline When Writing Your Book

Okay, writers...let's get real. When's the last time you achieved something without setting a goal? (Don't worry, I'll wait.)

Nine times out of ten, we--humans--do not get around to accomplishing our goals if there is no urgency or deadline attached to it. Well, the same applies to any book-writing goal. NO DEADLINE, NO BOOK. At least not as soon as you would like to have it written.

Deadlines help you reach your goals. Setting a deadline is an actionable step. Another benefit of a deadline is that it can be broken down into mini deadlines. For instance, if you desire to write a seven-chapter book in two months, then you can break down that deadline by writing one chapter per week. That’s reasonable. With this process, you will reach your deadline in about seven weeks. If you decide to have your book edited (which you should), you have a week of wiggle room, or you can set another deadline for the editing process. See how we just set a goal AND deadline for a seven-chapter book and it doesn't seem overwhelming?! That's the power of setting deadlines. Keep in mind that deadlines are different for everyone. They may depend on budget, access to resources, skill set, and expertise, and personal circumstances. 

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3 Tips To Help You Write A Book Faster

3 Tips To Help You Write A Book Faster

Writing a book is not easy. Sure, there are some simple strategies you can use to make the book-writing process more digestible, but the work still needs to be done. The WRITING still needs to be done. If you're anything like me, you don't want to wait 17 years to write the second chapter of your book after writing the first, and then another 17 years to write chapter three. I'm exaggerating, of course, but I know that writing a book can be a slow process for some people. And I understand that there are different types of writers, so there are different types of writing processes; however, I have a few tips that I believe will help every type of writer write their book faster.

1 || Put your book in a 3-ring binder so you know it’s real

This may sound cheesy and pretentious all at the same time, but it works. Sometimes, we get so tied to our computers/laptops, that we can't see our writing progress or lack thereof. If you print your book out and see those bald-headed chapters, then it'll hopefully inspire you to fill them out. Or you may find that you actually need to edit a few chapters and scale down. Or you may find that your book is not that far from publish-worthy. I'm telling you, the physical, printed papers help with the book-writing process. It will feel more like a book, and it will be organized in case you want family and friends to proofread it.

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Have You Written Your Book Yet?

Have You Written Your Book Yet?

Happy Monday, writers!

This blog post is for those who want to write a book and haven't quite gotten around to it. Be encouraged...help is here!

Writing a book is overwhelming. I get it. But if I can share something with you, writing a book is manageable if you use a proven system or process. *Cue the plug* I honestly think my latest workbook, How To Write Your First Book: Helping Aspiring Authors Overcome the Book-Writing Hurdle can help you get your book written FASTER! Why? Because it explains the 5-step process that I use to write all my books. It's also "write-in-able." Meaning, you can write your thoughts, ideas, and answers inside the book.

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Why Deadlines Are Important When Writing A Book

Why Deadlines Are Important When Writing A Book

Let's talk about deadlines!

I'll keep this blog post short and sweet.

Deadlines help turn goals into accomplishments. Knowingly, it's important to set a deadline when writing a book because without a deadline, the goal is just a dream. As kids, we were taught that dreams come true, but our parents failed to mention the process for making our dreams a reality. Well, I'm here to tell you that a part of that dreams-to-reality process is setting goals with deadlines and going through the necessary steps to accomplish said goals. For instance, if your goal is to write (and publish) a book before a family member passes away, then your deadline is of urgency if that family member is ill. Of course, no one knows the exact date of when someone is to leave this earth, but wisdom and discernment should be used in these types of circumstances. I didn't mean for this blog post to be morbid, I just wanted to stress the importance of deadlines. Why? Because aspiring authors, sometimes, can get caught up in the glamour of writing a book and forget to make book writing a realistic action item. 

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Why You Should Set A Goal Before Writing Your Book

Why You Should Set A Goal Before Writing Your Book

GOALS! They're a popular hashtag on social media, but do we really know how important they are?! Goals help us strive toward something, and that something can be a want or a need.

Today, I'm writing this post to let my aspiring authors know that you need to set a goal before writing your book if you want to have any type of writing success. Ask any published author, and I'm 99% sure they'll agree. If your goal--for example--is to be famous, then you may want to look into traditional print because of its influence and exposure to various mediums and bookstores. You may also want to look into hiring a professional editor and graphic designer to help you edit and create your work, as well as a book coach to help motivate you to write. I’m not saying you can’t do all of this yourself--edit, design, motivate--I'm saying there’s more to consider when your goal is bigger.

Identifying a book goal can set the tone for an author's unwritten book. It can help that writer take into account all technicalities, legalities, and fees associated with his or her creative work. For instance, the purchase of an ISBN number is not a small fee (to some), so it may be worth it to have a specific goal in mind before investing in the 13-digit book number. After all, the publishing platforms that I'm familiar with (Amazon, CreateSpace, and Smashwords) give you the option of a free ISBN number when you publish through them. If your goal is to be a National Bestseller, then you may want to consider purchasing your own ISBN number. If your goal, however, is to write a book to cross off your bucket list, then a free ISBN number may be perfect for you. See how it all depends on the goal?!

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